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BizTalk: How to fix regional settings problem (decimal number formatting)

September 3, 2012 Leave a comment

The regional settings of the operating system wherein your BizTalk Server is hosted, affects how the numbers/date are formatted. This in some cases, becomes a problem when trying to insert data in SQL Server using WCF-SQL.

For instance if the server is setup to use Dutch regional settings, the decimal number is separated by (,) comma. When you try to insert a data for instance 10.001, it becomes 10001. To fix the problem, you need to change the regional settings of the service account wherein the host instance is running.

Basically there are two things you can do.

One is to logon the account -> Go to regional settings -> Change the number formatting.

Now, if it’s impossible to login the account, you can fix it by changing the registry settings, for this you need the SID of the user account.

Updating Regional settings of an account using registry:

1. Open Regedit.

2. To get the SID, navigate to HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\ProfileList

Browse to every folder below and using the value in ProfileImagePath, you can determine the correct user account.

Then use the SId of the folder.

3. Once you have the GUID, browse to: HKEY_USERS\<SID in step 2>\Control Panel\International

Change the string values, for Decimal, change the sDecimal value.

 

NFS: How to connect to NFS using Windows Server 2008 R2 without using User Mapping Server

June 29, 2012 6 comments

When connecting to NFS shared folder the windows credentials needs to be mapped to a equivalent unix account+ group. 

In Windows Server 2008 R2 the support for User Mapping is dropped and the same functionality can only be achived using Identity Management for Unix Components (extension schema for Active Directory).

Below describes on how you can connect to a NFS folder without using User Mapping Server.

A. Install NFS Client

Step 1. Enable File Services Role. Go to Server Management – > Add Roles -> File Services

Step 2. Install Services for Network File System. Go to File Services – > Add Role Services

 

B. Update NFS Client Registry

In this step, we are going to map the anonymous user credential to the unix account credential that you’ll be using to connect to NFS share. First you need to get the User Id and Group Id of the unix account from the unix administrator. It should be of decimal value like: UserId= 6500000 GroupId=4200. Once you have it, we can proceed.

1. Open Regedit.

2. Go to \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ClientForNFS\CurrentVersion\Default.

3. Create 2 DWORD value, one for AnonymousUid with decimal value=<User Id> and another for AnonymousGid with decimal value=<GroupId>.

It should look like this:

4.  Restart the NFS Client. Go to Administrative Tools -> Services for Network File System (NFS) ->

C. Test NFS Connection

1. Open command prompt.

2. Type:  mount -u:<UserName and not UserId> -p:<Password> <SharedNFSFolder> <drive letter to mount, Ex: J:>

3. dir <drive letter:>

Copy file to this NFS folder. This is only way to confirm that the registry hacking is successfully. Because by default if the anonymous access is turned on in NFS side, you can see the files without having to supply user/password.

Note: Limitation is that, you can only connect to a single NFS share because it would use the same UserId and Group Id everytime you connect.

Categories: Windows Server Tags: ,
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